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are watching "bbc world news america," still to come -- the u.s. education system is slipping down the global rankings. we talked to one woman with radical ideas for an overhaul. life like robotic patients are used by doctors and nurses in the uk who want to practice their clinical skills. they suffer from a range of problems like asthma and severe infections. >> john is sick. he has been in a car crash and he is struggling to breathe. these doctors are trying to figure out what to do. if they cannot, no one dies. these robots are different. they are controlled to react to treatment second by second. "although we are taught in books what to do in certain situations, is very different when you have equipment, and you have people talking to you. run through.way to >> there are other members of the family. he can heartbeat -- he can have a heartbeat and describe the symptoms. it is cutting edge technology. it's not the only new technology here. the robots are on patrol. they're setting up and delivering the tea and coffee. they also are sorting the mail and they have revolutionized the policy. >
plate said that she was recovering well. >> i expect her to recover and continue with our education and hopefully go on to university. >> that education is the point, the cost for which he suffered, and to which she is now devoted. >> when you educate a girl, you educate the whole family. you educate a generation. you educate all the other coming children. >> in launching the malala fund, she shows a determination to turn this terrible experience into something positive. quite courage and resolution have turned a 15-year-old schoolgirl into a powerful, global symbol of the right of girls to be educated. >> she said god has given her a second life and she will use it well. >> what an extraordinary young woman. as she continues to recover, today the taliban are the focus of talks in london between the leaders of pakistan and afghanistan. the goal is to create a more stable environment for when nato forces leave afghanistan in 2014. the mission is to get the taliban to negotiate peace, but what are the chances? >> 12 years into a war that has cost 440 british lives, the prime minister
what was important in life. education being the primary importance and if i heard once i must have heard everyday in my childhood education opens the door of opportunity for you. it took me a while to realize that that's not the only thing it does for you. it also enriches you as a person. but she also taught me what i think the most important thing and that's to be caring about people. now, my mom didn't understand public service in the way that i've participated in it. sort of didn't lead community boards or lead -- >> rose: she probably didn't have time! >> she didn't. she was raising two kids and working six days a week and trying to survive. but she showed me what it meant to care about people. i detail in the book how my mother was a local nurse to the projects in the co-op city where we lived, how giving she was to everyone she's met. and i learned from her example that that was an important value in life to give to others. >> rose: did you also learn in your experience that you cannot do it alone? >> oh, gosh, that's what the whole book is about. it's how i stand on the sho
month-- she insisted she will go on advocating for the education of girls. >> i'm getting better day by day. it's just because of people. because all the people, men, women, children, all of them, all of them have prayed for me. because of these prayers, god has given me a second life. this is a new life. i want to serve the people. i want every girl, every child to be educated. >> sreenivasan: the teenager is expected to remain in britain for some time. newly installed secretary of state john kerry had his first day on the job today. the former senator entered the state department's harry truman building to a big crowd and loud cheers from staffers. he said he hopes to help make the world more prosperous and peaceful. wall street had its worst day of the year to date, amid new concerns about europe and its debt load. the dow jones industrial average fell back under 14,000 losing 129 points to close at 13,880. the nasdaq dropped nearly 48 points to close at 3131. baltimore ravens fans celebrated their super bowl win today. it was the second time the team has won the nfl championship.
campaign for girl'' education in pakistan despite the attack. you are watching "bbc world news america." still to come -- backstage drama at russia's famous bolshoi ballet after an attack on its artistic director. now one of its biggest stars claims there is a conspiracy against him. we may finally have an answer to one of the most hotly contested questions in science -- where did we all evolves from -- evolve from? an international effort has been mapping out thousands of trades to tradestrait -- traits to unlock the clues. >> it is interesting to see that this hypothetical central ancestors had a number of features very different from ours. very -- for example, for all over its body. a white, for a belly, long, furry tail -- white, furry belly and long, furry tail. fleshy nose not unlike ours. it had year bonds to help it here and translate sounds from noise into neurological impulses -- it had ear bones. it had some features that were like us and some that were different. we might be able to pick this up in both of our hands, but it is different in that it is much less specialized.
evidence that teachers matter most in education reform. and when we got started building one goal we realized that nationally and locally there were no college access or persistent presiders that were using exceptional teachers as the focal point of their work. >> reporter: so one goal has partnered with the chicago public schools and is currently in 23 of the district's high schools. the program hopes to be in half of all chicago high schools by 2017 and is already expanding nationally. here's how it works: a one goal teacher takes on a group of 25 students and sticks with them for three years beginning in their junior year of high school. the teacher's instruction focuses on three pillars: prepping students for a.c.t. test, guiding them as they apply to college and helping them develop specific leadership skills. >> the five leadership principles that we spend time working on are professionalism, ambition, resilience, integrity and resourcefulness. the reason those five fields are important to us is because those five working in concert are predictive of success in college. >> repo
and authentic, we are not used easily to change. but it's been an amazing run so in education reform we have done something very different. health-care reform, we've done very different. government reorganization we've done differently. we've managed in a very short period of time to really try to maintain that authentic culture but actually try to find a new way to do business going forward. >> as you know when hurricane hit here it hit the northward with huge force. and so many people suffered so much. and questions were raised about race and other issues. where are you in rebuilding the northward? where are you in trying to, whatever those scars were, get them to heal. >> yes, well let me say this. the storm did not discriminate. this storm, and people have a hard time envisioning this, really put the entire city underwater, not just the 9th ward. the lake view, again tilly, black neighborhood, white neighborhoods, old neighborhood, newer nab hoods got completely wiped. not every part of the city is back. and this is not a surprise. the best quote about it he said when it gets cold, the p
visa holders, more green cards to skilled and highly educated immigrants, a program for low skilled migrant workers and cracking down on those who employ undocumented workers. what does it all mean for california? here in the bay area? joining me with answers are marcela davison aviles with san jose mexican heritage festival. emil guillermo, writer for the asian american legal defense and education fund. and aarti kohli, research fellow at uc berkeley. aarti, we're going to begin with you because these are all proposals right now. really any overhaul to our immigration system is going to have a big repercussion here in california. can you tell us what that would be? >> of course. we're the state with the largest number of immigrants. we have 2.5 million undocumented immigrants and we've got a third of our registered voters are lawful immigrants. so any way you cut it, it's going to have a huge impact. some of the -- and there's a lot in here for everyone. employers, students who came here at a young age. they're called dreamers. agricultural workers. some of the things that people m
america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. and contributions in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ (trolley dings.) - thanks, trolley! hi, neighbour! it's me, daniel tiger. today i'm going to school! want to come to school with me? grr-ific! come on! - let's put your things in your cubby, big and strong tiger. - i am big and stron
's press secretary said this about the sequester. quote, across-the-board cuts to education, to research and development, would have repeat, would have, damaging effects on our economy and our long-term economic prospects. unquote. a growing number of analysts believe the political will to stop the sequester is lacking. it will take effect, at least temporarily, they believe, and that will pose a further the f of this year. question. the fed is saying that the fourth quarter contraction october, november, december of 2012 was due chiefly to quote unquote transitory factors. is this true? or is the recovery stalling out pat buchanan? >> i think basically it is true, john. the u.s. economy is out of the intensive care it was in, in 2007-2008 but it has been walking the hospital halls ever since. the growth has been growing at an average of about 2%, unemployment is where it was when barack obama took office, we are adding about 150,000 jobs a month, but john, the real problem here is this slow growing is occurring when we have had five straight trillion dollars worth of defense deficits t
's author and educator lou heckler. >> the carolina panthers has had a so-so season despite having a top wide receiver in steve smith. smith has had a bit of a checkered career off the field, fighting with teammates in fact, but his athleticism and grace on the field are unmatched. now, he's gaining attention for his shoes. as he has been counseled about his bouts with anger, he has been encouraged to reach out to others instead of boiling over at them. one of the things he decided to do is to donate shoes to people who have none, and he has embraced this with the same enthusiasm that he has catching a football. plus, as a symbol of his commitment he removes his football shoes after every game and leaves them there on the field. someone gets a nice par of athletic shoes and a wonderful souvenir. it got me thinking, do i pay lip service to helping others, or am i really committed to a cause? like most of you, i have been blessed in many, many ways. i'm planning on making this year a year where i truly show my gratitude with blatant actions, not words. how about you? does someone you know
. >> there is no reason that the jobs of thousands of americans who work in national security or education or clean energy, not to mention the growth of the entire economy, should be put in jeopardy just because folks in washington couldn't come together to eliminate a few special interest tax loopholes. >> reporter: republicans dismissed the calls for more tax increases, and many argue the threat of the automatic spending cuts known as the sequester are the only way to force democrats to accept more spending cuts. but their leverage may be limited. >> i think we will have the sequester for a short period of time, probably until the first civilian employee of the government is furloughed, which might take about a week. and then, that pain may be enough to cause the people on capitol hill and the president to come to some sort of rational deal. >> reporter: the short-term budget fight comes as the medium-term outlook for federal red ink is improving. the congressional budget office figures the deficit will come in at $845 billion this year, the first deficit under $1 trillion since 2008. that's projected t
. we really have to take stock of the fact we're not doing justice by our education system, by our infrastructure, by our research and development, by the policies that are needed to lift up the people of this country. and no government doesn't have to do everything. of course. we understand that. but you know, the idea of declaring the wealthiest few in the country, the job creators, well, the job creators are the people who either do or do not have money to go to the stores and purchase things and to do for their families. and when they can't the economy sinks. >> rose: i want to talk about all of those, whether the digital revolution, but with washington we just had an election. >> yeah. >> rose: president obama re-elected. we see now some movement towards immigration reform. >> yeah. >> rose: because elections have results. >> yeah. >> and they realize the latino population have shown their electoral strength is that where change is going to come from? because politicians finally began notwithstanding the corporate power that you mentioned, and the united decision by the suprem
about the film was to show a type of education, you know that is equally valuable but completely different from what people normally see. >> rose: finally here is tony scott from the "new york times" on this program talking about your film, roll tape. >> tell me what it was that you saw in beasts of the southern wild. >> i saw an extraordinary energy and imaginative free do. i mean one thing that-- because it's an independent movie, a small scale, you know, low budget kind of seat of the pants production. and so many of the movies that have come out recently that fit that template are very kind of somber and grim and kind of literally realistic, and about sort of the missery and struggle of people in trouble. and this one was so magical, and so imaginative it had all of that kind of, you know, social conscience and neorealist exploration but also this sense of really the only word i have is magic. and it went, it kind of invented this world and got so wonderfulfully inside the consciousness of this child, you know t reminded me of the first time i ever read huckleberry finn. the
party, education, being inclusive. you know, sort of a difference in tone but you know, i don't-- i think the republican problems are serious. ronald reagan won young voters for republicans and they were the best group in 12012, 30 years later that group that-- was still-- that's the problem the republicans have. >> we don't have a problem with you. we love having you every single friday night, mark, david, thank you. and mark and david keep up the talk on the "doubleheader," recorded in our newsroom. that will be posted at the top of the rundown later tonight. >> brown: finally tonight, a conversation with humorist dave barry. barry is well-known for his long-running newspaper column about all things wacky and wonderful in miami. and miami is the setting for his new novel, which includes a bachelor party run amuck, a wedding that's interrupted by the arrival of a boat of haitian refugees, a large python snake, some russian gangsters and, well, a lot more. the book is titled "insane city". dave barry joined me in our studio last week. here's our conversation. david barry, welcome. >
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)